Lampredotto in Florence: What It Is & Where to Eat It

Squishy, slushy, slimy: you’d never use these words to describe a refined delicacy, right? Well, prepare to change your mind! Lampredotto in Florence will prove you wrong in the best of ways. 

Close up of a tripe sandwich in Florence
Lampredotto is Florence’s most adventurous street food option. Photo credit: Kirk K

Florentines have mastered the art of making every part of the animal edible—even delicious, we’d argue. And how can you prove us wrong, when lampredotto just…exists? 

Join us to discover where to eat lampredotto in Florence—and if you’re wondering what lampredotto even is, we’ve got you covered! 

What Is Lampredotto? 

Most people might not want a lampredotto to appear in their Instagram feed. Have you ever seen one? It’s a messy bulk of greasy meat, covered with a green slime, squished in a panino. 

If you do share that photo, you’ll also have to explain to your friends what lampredotto is, and trust us: nobody will believe you. How can you explain that it is delightful, even if it is made with the fourth stomach of a cow?  

Yes, there’s more than one stomach. Yes, Florentines eat them all. 

You can only do one thing: taste it for yourself. And after that, you’ll change your perspective: boiled tripe on a soft bed of panini bread dipped in just enough gravy. Add the perfect mix of salt, pepper, and salsa verde: literally green sauce, made from boiled eggs and oh-so-much oil and parsley. 

If perfection was a taste, well… here it’d be. 

Tripe sandwich on a deli counter with a man wearing an apron in the background
The quintessential lampredotto experience is grabbing one in sandwich form from a no-frills stall. Photo credit: Nicolas Mirguet

Lampredotto in Florence, Now & Then 

But beware: even if its most famous form is a tripe sandwich, lampredotto can be so much more. You can eat it off of a plate, in zimino (with vegetables) or in lasagna. You may even find it as the filling for Chinese dumplings, and it’s still delicious. 

There’s no limit to what lampredotto can be, except for Florentine imagination. The secret here is the history of Florentine cuisine, mostly composed of humble, simple dishes. Many poorer Florentines couldn’t afford to waste any part of the animal—even the scariest ones. 

This is why Florentine people cooked up so many ways to enjoy the little they had. Be glad they did: you’re now able to savor a unique specialty, and a locals’ favorite. It’s the perfect lunch or street food bite to give you energy while wandering around the city. 

Gravy being poured over an elegantly plated open faced tripe sandwich
A modern and upscale take on lampredotto. Photo credit: City Foodsters

Where to Find the Best Lampredotto in Florence 

Florentines are famous for enjoying a good fight—may it be intellectual or a notch more physical, as in historical football. So, it should come as no surprise that the discussion on which local lampredotto place is the best is flaming hot. 

To make sure that you won’t cross an angry Florentine, we’ve decided to reveal to you the five lampredotto spots you can’t miss in Florence.  

  • Trippaio del Porcellino “Orazio” (Piazza del Mercato Nuovo): An absolute classic lampredotto spot that you must try for your own good (trust us on this one). It’s the perfect snack after visiting the nearby Mercato del Porcellino! 
  • Il Trippaio Di Sant’Ambrogio (inside Sant’Ambrogio Market, Piazza Lorenzo Ghiberti): The most hipster lampredotto in Florence, found near the university. 
  • La Buticche di Lampredotto (Piazza Nerli): A hidden gem, this is the lampredotto that everybody seems to forget, even if it’s actually really good. 
  • L’Antico Trippaio (Piazza de’ Cimatori): The mainstream choice for lampredotto in Florence, this spot is popular for good reason. 
  • Aurelio I’ Re Del Lampredotto: Located outside the city center, founder Aurelio is the self-proclaimed King of Lampredotto. A little cocky, maybe, but he has his reasons. 

You’re now ready to go! Share your opinion with your fellow Florentine friends… if you dare. 

Lampredotto (tripe sandwich) in paper wrapping on a wooden table with a person's hand holding a plastic cup of red wine above
A Florentine classic: lampredotto from Trippaio del Porcellino. Photo credit: Trippaio del Porcellino